Command and Staff College











Memorabilia


• The idea of Staff College in British India was first mooted in 1875. The proposal, however, failed to find support in the British War Office.
• Field Marshal Lord Kitchener, who arrived as Commander-in­Chief in India, on 28 November 1902, decided to establish the College.
• In January 1904, the Government of India sanctioned the expenditure to establish the College; to be known as Indian Staff College.
• On March 21, 1905, Indian Army Order 185 provided for the setting up of a temporary Staff College, till such time that the buildings at Quetta had been constructed.
• The Owl resting on crossed swords and surmounted by a crown, together with the motto "Tam Marte Quam Minerva" was the first emblem of the College. It was retained from 1905 to 1950.
• The first Entrance Examination of Staff Course was held in May 1905.
• The College was initially established at Deolali, in an Old Musketery School, near Bombay (now Mumbai) on 1 July 1905.
• Brigadier General A.W.L Bayly was appointed the first Commandant of the College.
• The first Course consisted of 24 officers of which one third were from the British Service and two third from the Indian Army. The duration of the course was set for two years.
• Distinguished visitors to the College during its first year of establishment included Lieutenant General Sir B. Duff, General McArthur accompanied by his son (later General) Douglas McArthur and Brigadier General Sir H. Rawlinson, Commandant Camberley Staff College.
• The first ever presentation of a souvenir was made to the College in 1905. It was presented by Brigadier General Sir H. Rawlinson, Commandant Camberley Staff College.
• The College closed for the first time for the summer vacation from 1 May to 30 June 1906 after its inception in Quetta.
• The College was shifted to Quetta in 1907 and was formally opened by Lieutenant General Smith Dorrien, Commanding 4th Quetta Division, on 1 June.
• In 1907 when the College Library was shifted from Deolali to Quetta, it was housed in a single room of the College building.
• The College was renamed as "Staff College Quetta" and attained its full course in 1908.
• During 1908, the College was visited by the C-in-C Lord Kitchener and the Khan of Kalat; the visit of the latter being commemorated by the presentation of a Silver Rose Bowl. The first of the foreign military attaches in the person of Colonel Inoqake of the Imperial Japanese Army also visited the College this year.
• In 1909, for the first time, two allied officers from the Australian Forces joined the course, from outside Indian and British services.
• In 1909 the College won, for the first time, the Challenge Cup Trophy for Quetta.
• In 1910, the first ever outdoor exercise, Long Distance Patrol, was held covering a distance of 160 miles in three days.
• On creation of the General Staff Branch in 1910, the scholastic title of 'professor' was dropped and instructors came to be known as General Staff Officers.
• In 1911, the College was visited by Lord Harding, Viceroy of India, General Sir Douglas Haig, GOC-in-C Southern Army and representatives of the Russian and German Armies.
• Major A. Skeen of 24 Punjab Regiment was the first graduate of the College who was later posted as a Directing Staff in 1912. The year also saw Captain T. A. Blarney as a student, later destined to be Australia's first Field Marshal.
• 1913 saw the arrival of the first officer from New Zealand.
• It was in 1914 that the officers from the Staff College at Quetta and Camberley became honorary members of one another's Officer's Mess.
• The College functioned as a training establishment during World War I, and trained officers from Indian and British armies.
• The Staff College transformed into Cadet College Quetta in May 1915 as a temporary measure, during the War.
• 15 September 1915 brought to a close, the first nine and a half years of the College due to outbreak of World War 1.
• The first ever College journal 'Owlet' was published in 1918.
• The Staff College re-opened in 1919. Among the 50 students was Lieutenant Colonel Auchinleck, a future Field Marshal.
• The journal taken out in 1919 titled "Owl Pie".
• In 1922 the title "Owl Pie" was changed to "The Owl".
• In 1923 the students of the course and the members of the faculty visited the battle fields of Iraq.
• The year 1933 saw the first Indian officer cross the threshold of Staff College Quetta. He was Captain K M Cariappa, who later rose to be the first Indian Commander-in-Chief of the post independence Indian Army.
• Field Marshal, the Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, served as a member of the Faculty from June 1934 to June 1937.
• Annual pantomime was introduced in 1936.
• During World War II, the normal courses were replaced by six months Short War Courses that continued till the end of 1946. This was a period of war, when in addition to the short six months courses, even shorter courses of three months were started to provide staff officers for static headquarters. It was such courses that ladies belonging to Women's Auxiliary Corps of India (WACI) also attended, thus lending a tender image to a male bastion of military education.
• Duration of the two-year course was replaced by a year long academic regimen in 1939. It is since then that the course is run for one year.
• The second War Course in July 1940 brought the first two Muslim (later Pakistani) officers; Captain (later Brigadier) K M Idris and Captain (later Major General) Nazir Ahmed.
• The present College Mess was commissioned in 1940.
• Field Marshal Muhammad Ayub Khan attended the Staff Course from December 1940 to June 1941, as a Captain from 14 Punjab Regiment.
• 1942 course featured John Masters who was destined to be a world famous writer with such classics as 'Bhowani Junction' to his credit. He later immortalised the curricular and social life of the College in his autobiography 'The Road Past Mandalay'.
• It was in 1943 that the College got the first Muslim (later Pakistani) officer to serve on the faculty in the person of Lieutenant Colonel Muhammad Iftikhar Khan, who later rose to be a Major General and died while in service in an air crash.
• On independence, in 1947, the course was prematurely terminated and Indian and British officers departed for their homelands.
• At the time of partition of the Sub-continent, the College was commanded by Major General H. L. Davies, who handed over the command to Colonel Carrington Smith in September 1947, who in turn handed the same to Lieutenant Colonel (later General) Agha Muhammad Yahya Khan. Lieutenant Colonel A. M. Yahya Khan officiated as the Commandant until the arrival of the Commandant on 2 February 1948. The chief difficulty the College had to face was the almost complete absence of instructors; Lieutenant Colonel A. M. Yahya Khan being the only one left from the pre-independence team.
• The College lost two thirds of its assets to the Indian Army in 1947. The only thing that it inherited intact, apart from the buildings was a library of 10,000 invaluable volumes.
• The first Commandant on Independence was Brigadier General I. C. A. Lauder.
• Quaid-i-Azarn Muhammad Ali Jinnah accompanied by Miss Fatima Jinnah visited the College for the first time on 14 June 1948 and lunched in the Mess; the first official function to be held in the Mess after partition.
• The College resumed its courses on 7 July 1948.
• The same year the College was visited by the Commander-in­Chief, General Gracey and Prime Minister Liaqat Ali Khan in September 1948.
• In 1948, the Tactical School which had been in Dehra Dun also moved to Quetta and became a wing of the College.
• In 1949, the first four British officers came to attend the course in Pakistan.
• May 1949 saw the introduction of an Officers Course for Brigadiers and Lieutenant Colonels.
• Governor General, Khawaja Nazimuddin visited the College in August 1949, while Field Marshal Sir Slim and Sir Douglas Gracey visited in October the same year.
• The first officer from Australia, Canada and United States of America attended the 1950 Staff Course.
• Field Marshal Muhammad Ayub Khan attended Senior Officer's Course in 1950, as a Major General.
• HIM the Shah of Iran visited the College is March 1950.
• 1950 also saw the first ever change made in the Emblem. Latin motto 'Tam Marte Quam Minerva' was replaced by Saadi's Persian Couplet 'Pir Sho Biyamoz Saadi' that stayed till 1956.
• Captain S. Wajahat Hussain (later Major General and Commandant) joined the College as Grade III staff officer in 1950.
• In September 1951, the College ran its first 'Charity Bazaar' in aid of the soldiers' families and Mission Hospitals.
• The last link of the College with the Regular British Officers of the old Indian Army finished between the period bracketing late 1951 and early 1952; Major General I. C. A. Lauder being the last to depart in April 1952.
• General Muhammad Ayub Khan paid a visit to the College as the Commander-in-Chief in 1953.
• In the post partition period, Major General H.I. Davies, Major General LC.A. Lauder and Major General A.Tilly remained the Commandants of the Staff College Quetta till August 1954 respectively.
• Major General M. A. Latif Khan was the first Pakistani Commandant of the College. He assumed the charge as the Commandant on 4 August 1954.
• The College celebrated its Golden Jubilee on 1 July 1955.
• In 1956 when Pakistan became a Republic the crown from the Emblem was removed.
• The Tactical Wing moved out to Infantry School in 1957.
• In 1959, for the first time, a joint Exercise was held with the Pakistan Air Force Staff College.
• Lieutenant Colonel Sahibzad Gul, 6 Lancers remained at the College as a Directing Staff from 1959 till 1962.
• Queen Elizabeth II, accompanied by Prince Phillip graced the College with a visit on 5 February 1961.
• The College was also visited by Tunku Abdul Rehman Putra, the Prime Minister of Malaya in October 1962.
• Formally, it was in 1962, that the Command of the College was upgraded and Major General Sahabzada Yaqub Ali Khan became the first officer to assume this appointment. It was in his tenure that the College was re-designated as Command and Staff College with effect from 17 September 1962.
• Field Marshal Sir Claude Auchinleck visited the College in 1963.
• A separate command course for senior officers was also started which in 1964 was renamed the Army War Course.
• At the time of World War I (August 1914-June 1919), partition of Indian Sub-continent (August 1947 -February 1948), Indo­Pakistan War (September 1965 -May 1966) the College functioned without the Commandants. The College was also closed temporarily and later reactivated after a short closure of six months during 1965 War.
• Braithwaite Road was renamed as Sahibzad Gul Road, after the valiant death of Lieutenant Colonel Sahibzad Gul in the 1965 Indo-Pakistan War.
• In 1968 the first regular one year staff course, after a spell of three short courses, started. The intake was increased to 120 students. The course was thus divided into A and B Divisions.
• The College bade farewell to Army War Course in 1970 which was shifted to National Defence College Rawalpindi.
• The old College building which was commissioned in 1907 and had the capacity to accommodate only 60 students was brought down in a solemn ceremony on 26 March 1971.
• For the construction of new building the foundation stone was laid on 21 September 1972 by the then Chief of the Army Staff, General Tikka Khan. The new building was commissioned in July 1975, however, the inauguration ceremony was held on 7 April 1976.
• The award of Bachelor of Science (Honours) War Studies Degree was awarded to the graduating students in 1978 for the first time.
• The Museum of the College was formally inaugurated on 16 May 1979. It was established in the Monty House where Colonel B.L. Montgomery (later Field Marshal) lived as Senior Instructor from 6 June 1934 to 28 Jun 1937.
• On 4 July 1979 the design of the emblem was changed. The Owl was replaced by the word Iqra and the motto 'Pir Sho Biyamoz Saadi'. The new Emblem was designed by a member of the then faculty, Lieutenant Colonel Anwar Munir ud Din (later Brigadier) from 17 Punjab Regiment.
• "The Owl" was renamed as "The Review" in 1979.
• General Walter Walker who had been the DS in the College in 1940 visited the College in 1979.
• The College celebrated its Platinum Jubilee on 18 September 1980. General Muhammad Zia UI Haq, the President of Pakistan graced the occasion as the Chief Guest.
• The newly constructed College Mosque was inaugurated on 19 September 1980 by General Muhammad Zia ul Haq.
• The first issue of the College quarterly professional magazine "The Citadel" was published in 1984.
• The present Al Nisa (Ladies Club) building was inaugurated in 1989.
• The new Library Complex (Ghazi and Naqvi Library) was constructed in August 1992.
• The old Directing Staff Tea Lounge was converted into Commandant's Office in 1993.
• Introduction of early morning recitation of Quranic verses along with English translation at the start of the day, on ETV Network, started in 1993.
• General Pervez Musharraf visited the College for the first time as COAS on 10 December 1998.
• Major General Javaid Afzal Khan, the Commandant, died while on an outdoor activity on 14 November 1999.
• The Chief Executive and COAS, General Pervez Musharraf inaugurated the new Married Officers Quarter Block 'Javaid Afzal Block' in 1999.
• Non Residence Course (NRC) became part of the curriculum from the class of 2000.
• In order to pay homage to our Shuhada, a corner was dedicated at the entrance to the main College building in 2000.
• The College Website www.cscquetta.com was inaugurated by President and COAS, General Pervez Musharraf on 30 November 2000.
• Iqra Army public School and College celebrated its Silver Jubilee in 2000.
• The Staff Course 2002, for the first time, successfully completed the course in a near paper free concept of instruction.
• The College attained a singular distinction of ISO 9001 Certification in 2003, in acknowledgement of its adherence to modern management processes and high quality training and administrative procedures from Lloyd's Register.
• Masters Degree in the Art and Science of Warfare was conferred upon the Faculty and student officers of Staff Course 2003, for the first time.
• The students' threshold crossed the figure of 300 in 2004.
• The construction of College Centenary Monument (A replica of the old College building Clock Tower) started on 23 April 2004.
• Centenary course commenced on 14 February 2005.
• Centenary celebrations to commemorate '100 Years of Excellence' are scheduled from 1-3 April 2005.